• Ancient Land New Land

    Ancient Land, New Land

    The Mi’kmaq have inhabited Epekwitk (Prince Edward Island) for millennia. At this site, known in Mi’kmaq as Skmaqn, or “waiting place,” the Mi’kmaq met the French in the 18th century to renew their friendship and military alliance at a time when the French and British empires were fighting for supremacy in North America.

    As Europeans settled on what had become to be known as Isle Saint Jean, the major European players were France and Great Britain, each of whom started constructing forts and sending soldiers, warships and settlers. A key strategy of the French was to establish a close alliance with the Mi’kmaq, one that was maintained by missionaries. Thus Skmaqn became the French fort Port-la-Joye. The French saw it as the most strategic location as its harbour was large, sheltered, and easy to defend because of the narrow entrance through which any enemy ships would have to pass.

    One of the first permanent French settlements on the island, Port-la-Joye was the seat of colonial government and a port of entry. This site was surrendered to Great Britain in 1758 and renamed Fort Amherst, the British organized the deportation of more than 3,000 Acadians.

    $24.95
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  • Into the Wind A Novel of Acadian Resilience

    Into the Wind

    A gusty August morning … two children spot sails on the horizon … foreign soldiers enter their village. Johnston holds the reader close with this moving tale. The main characters, Marie and Charles, are fictional, but the story is not. It is based on well-documented historical facts about the 1755 removal of Acadians from Grand-Pré. Into the Wind presents that well-known event in a fresh way. It makes for a poignant, suspenseful novel about how two kids and a village deal with forces and events far beyondtheir control.

    $14.95
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  • Ni'n na L'nu The Mi'kmaq of Prince Edward Island

    Ni’n na L’nu The Mi’kmaq of Prince Edward Island

    • Winner of APMA Best Atlantic-Published Book Award 
    • Winner of PEI Book Award for Non-fiction

    This lavishly-illustrated book tells a story through words and images that has never before been told, not in any single book. The focus is entirely on the Mi’kmaq of the Island, an island which for thousands of years has been known to the Mi’kmaq and their ancestors as Epekwitk. That name means “cradle on the sea” and no more poetic description of PEI has ever been penned. The story of the PEI Mi’kmaq is one of adaptation and perseverance across countless generations in the face of pervasive change. Today’s environment is far from what it was millennia ago. So too, the economy, society, lifestyle, language and religion of the people has witnessed some dramatic shifts. Nonetheless, despite all the changes, today’s Mi’kmaq feel deeply connected to the Island in its entirety and to their ancestors and the values they still share. This book tells those many stories, and communicates much more. While the book is a stand-alone publication, it is also a companion to a travelling exhibition of the same name.

    $19.95
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