• Acadian Traditions on Candlemas Day

    Acadian Traditions on Candlemas Day

    Created by: Georges Arsenault

    Georges Arsenault’s latest edition to the Acadian Traditions series Most English-speaking people just associate the 2nd of February, or Groundhog Day, with superstitions related to the weather. In Acadian communities, however, it was known as Candlemas Day and at one time was an important religious and social festivity. Pancakes were the symbolic food of choice. In many villages, young Acadians went from door-to-door collecting food for a communal feast or to give to the poor. This book by Georges Arsenault enables us to discover a festivity rich in traditions and a significant part of the cultural heritage of Acadians everywhere.

    $19.95
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  • Georges ArsenaultJacinthe Laforest e

    Acadian Women of Prince Edward Island

    From the time of their arrival on Isle Saint-Jean in the early 1700s,Acadian women played a major role in the survival of the colony.Over the generations, they have been active in the home and in the community. They have nursed, taught, worked, sung, prayed, and served. Integrated into a well-documented text with numerous photographs, their testimonies provide a history of the Acadie of Prince Edward Island. This book relates how that history was lived by Acadian women and influenced by their action and determination.

    $19.95
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  • Afternoon Horses

    Afternoon Horses

    Created by: Deirdre Kessler

    Deirdre Kessler teaches creative writing and children’s literature at the University of Prince Edward Island. Her poetry has appeared in a number of collections, including The New Poets of Prince Edward Island and Landmarks: An Anthology of New Atlantic Canadian Poetry of the Land, and in chapbook form: Subtracting by Seventeen. She is the author of five children’s novels, including the Canadian Children’s Book Centre Award-winning Brupp Rides Again, and six picture books, including perennial favourites Lobster in My Pocket, and Lena and the Whale.

    $16.95
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  • All is Clam

    All is Clam

    Created by: Hilary MacLeod

    It’s Christmas at The Shores. There’s no snow yet, but there are so many outdoor lights that the tiny coastal village can be seen from space. Apart from Ian Simmons’ place, and he’s considered odd, there’s only one house in the village that isn’t lit up. It’s been dark for years. That’s about to change. Wild Rose Cottage is about to come to life, and death, once again. Meanwhile, the villagers wish for snow to complete the Christmas portrait. When it comes, it’s with the body of newcomer, Fitz Fitsimmons, a former acrobat turned bully and drunk. Mountie Jane Jamieson has seen murder here before, but none where she’d rather not catch the killer.

    $22.95
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  • Along Lot Seven Shore

    Along Lot Seven Shore

    Often, folksongs are left to stand alone, with no record as to the events, visions and principles that inspired them. Rarely do we get a glimpse of the poet’s view of the community and people he or she writes about. However, Donnie Doyle, in wanting to give something back to his community, has done just that. Along Lot Seven Shore is a fascinating combination of memoir, anecdote, narrative song and poetry, created by someone who has experienced that which he has written. In so doing, he shares glimpses of a way of life that makes and defines “community”; this particular community happens to be along Lot Seven Shore of Prince Edward Island (named so when the Island was divided into 67 lots and given in a Land Lottery to the English King’s patrons in 1767), but it could be anywhere in rural Canada.

    $14.95
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  • An Island Christmas Reader (Updated edition)

    An Island Christmas Reader (Updated edition)

    Created by: David Weale
    Artist: Dale McNevin

    An Island Christmas Reader is a book about Christmas past and present on Prince Edward Island. In 22 stories and essays, David Weale combines reminiscences of Islanders with his own musings to rekindle the memory of Christmas, where imagination and magic work hand in hand to create the “unsullied wonder of childhood vision.”

    $17.95
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  • Ancient Land New Land

    Ancient Land, New Land

    The Mi’kmaq have inhabited Epekwitk (Prince Edward Island) for millennia. At this site, known in Mi’kmaq as Skmaqn, or “waiting place,” the Mi’kmaq met the French in the 18th century to renew their friendship and military alliance at a time when the French and British empires were fighting for supremacy in North America.

    As Europeans settled on what had become to be known as Isle Saint Jean, the major European players were France and Great Britain, each of whom started constructing forts and sending soldiers, warships and settlers. A key strategy of the French was to establish a close alliance with the Mi’kmaq, one that was maintained by missionaries. Thus Skmaqn became the French fort Port-la-Joye. The French saw it as the most strategic location as its harbour was large, sheltered, and easy to defend because of the narrow entrance through which any enemy ships would have to pass.

    One of the first permanent French settlements on the island, Port-la-Joye was the seat of colonial government and a port of entry. This site was surrendered to Great Britain in 1758 and renamed Fort Amherst, the British organized the deportation of more than 3,000 Acadians.

    $24.95
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  • stars shall fall

    And All the Stars Shall Fall

    Created by: Hugh MacDonald

    After years of struggle by Blanchfleur to maintain its independence, the idyllic walled city of Aahimsa, a community of girls and women dedicated to making a life of peace free of the brutality and aggression of outsiders, and its prospering Manuhome, are suddenly victims of a brutal surprise attack by the forces of The World Federation of City States. Mabon and Nora are in hiding outside the city where they witness all the horrors of the assault. Adam, their adoptive son, is no longer with them, having been placed under the protection of Doctor Ueland at the Manuhome. Adam, known to the federation as The Last Wild Boy has been hunted down since his unauthorized birth in Aahimsa. Blanchfleur the mayor of Aahimsa along with her daughter and granddaughter Tish, flee for their lives along with hundreds of the Manuhome workers. A few of them are thrown together and, although some are strangers and long-time enemies, they are forced by circumstance to attempt to find a way to escape extinction in the outside world against powerful and relentless common enemies, traitors and especially the federation’s murderous and heartless robotic army. They must deal with great dangers and unexpected revelations. Can they manage to work together and adjust their thinking enough to survive and find happiness against such seemingly insurmountable odds?

    $12.95
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  • And My Name Is

    And My Name Is

    Created by: Margie Carmichael

    In this, Margie Carmichael’s first collection of short stories, ordinary women have extraordinary skills, gifts and strengths; they are women who live next door or in the distance, shadowed by fear or absence of recognition. Age, race, and culture connect in the timeless fabric of the quilt, with craft, patience, and faith connecting the women through the threads of their diversity.Anna tells of life after residential school; Irini reflects on her life in war-torn Afghanistan. In Tansie, two adults survive childhood abandonment. Freelance cosmetician to the dead Flora Hill offers insight into the lighter side of love, marriage, and death.Featuring illustrations by Dale McNevin, the book is a collaboration that began with an original painting and companion poem first published in the Maritime Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health 2000 Calendar.

    $19.95
  • Are We Friends Now? An Anthology By and About 2SLGBTQ+ Youth

    Are We Friends Now?

    Editor: Tom Ryan

    Are We Friends Now is a dynamic and exhilarating collection of writing from LGBTQ+ youth and allies from around PEI. The product of a collaboration between PEERS Alliance and the PEI Writers’ Guild, the multi-genre selections in Are We Friends Now are the result of several months of workshopping and brainstorming at the Queer Youth Writing Club, and also include pieces from adult volunteers. Are We Friends Now will appeal to readers of all ages, and makes a great addition to classroom and library collections.

    $17.95
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  • Ashes of My Dreams

    Ashes of My Dreams

    Created by: Stella Shepard

    Pregnant, abandoned by her lover, and cut off from her family, free-spirited and independent Gracie is determined to keep her baby and to raise him on her own.

    Protecting Elijah Blue from the nuns eager to adopt him out to a “better” home is only Gracie’s first battle…

    It takes a whole community of colourful neighbours and friends—and the dream-wisdom of spirits that protect her—for Gracie to navigate the cruel and impoverishing systems that judge and harass her as a single mom on PEI.

    She gets through with pride, grit, and humour—but nothing can protect her from her growing son’s desire to know his father’s identity.

    $22.95
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  • At First

    At First, Lonely

    Created by: Tanya Davis

    Best-known as a musician and a spoken-word performer, poet Tanya Davis has now taken to the page with At First, Lonely. In this collection, she reflects on life’s many passages: falling in love and out, the search for personal truth, the search for home. Davis’s style is one-of-a-kind: a blend of contemporary phrasing with profound personal expression. But her message is universal; over two million people have watched How to Be Alone, a film adaptation of her poem created by independent filmmaker Andrea Dorfman. Tanya Davis’ poetry challenges the intellect and touches deep places in the heart.

    $17.95
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